Lovely Hanoi and Ha Long Bay

Hanoi was amazing. I just had to start with that. After yet another overnight bus from Hue, Ben and I made our way to the famous Vietnam Backpacker Hostel. After going on the free walking tour around the city, we settled down on beer street for the night, drinking $0.25 pints of fresh local beer, Bia Hoi.

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The next morning we headed out to explore and get down and cultural around Hanoi. We started at the Women’s Museum and then headed to the Ho Chi Minh Mosoleum. We ended up at the park next door, where we were able to partake in some outdoor fitness activities with some locals (a little bit of zumba, a little bit of ballroom dancing). We also discovered an amazing dish native to Hanoi called BΓΊn nem, which was absolutely amazing (drool).

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On one of the many nights spent on Beer Street, we met an expat who told us about an alternative to the infamous Castaways Booze Cruise, as both Ben and I were hesitating dishing out $200 USD for a 3 day/2 night boat party. A couple days later we headed out to Cat Ba, an island in Ha Long Bay. We would take a boat through the bay and see the world famous towering limestone cliffs, as well as the floating villages in the bay.

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Lucky for us, the trip took all day so we really got to fully experience Ha Long Bay, both during the day and at nighttime. Unlucky for us it started to rain as soon as we got to Cat Ba, and it wouldn’t stop in the whole 5 days we spent there (we would later find out this typhoon-ish storm caused the most rainfall the area had seen in 40 years, and that about 40 people had died in the bay). So what do you do when you’re trapped on a beautiful island with beautiful beaches in the middle of a typhoon? You feel extremely grateful that you have a TV in your room with TWO movie channels in English (and no commercials!).

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On a cloudy but not so rainy day, we jumped at the opportunity to explore the island. We rented a bike and went to Fort Cannon, a small fort built by the French during their colonial rule. We also visited the Hospital Cave, a 17 room underground hospital and hideout which was in use until 1975. The cave is so vast that it was virtually indestructible, and seemed like real life James Bond underground lair. After a little chat with the guide at the entrance (who is an avid coin collector by the way – he had coins from all over the world, and I gladly gave him a Singapore dollar and some Filipino Pesos I had left over to add to his collection) he took us through the cave. We were able to see the different rooms that were built into the cave, some of them surgery rooms, some of them meeting rooms and so on. They even had a pool for exercising, as well as a dedicated area for combat training.

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After our boat back to Hanoi was cancelled twice because of the storm, we decided to take the longer and less scenic route that unfortunately avoids going through Halong Bay.

Next stop: Sapa!

Mellow Yellow rating : πŸ’› πŸ’› πŸ’› πŸ’› πŸ’›

Traveler’s tips : If you’re looking to party, meet people and have a fantastic time (and aren’t too tight on your budget), then do Castaways! Otherwise Cat Ba is a really great alternative, typhoon or not.
http://www.vietnambackpackerhostels.com/trips/ha-long-bay/ha-long-bay-and-castaways-island-3-days-2-nights/

I also wanted to mention someone else we met on lovely Beer Street, whose name escapes me at the moment. A photojournalist from Switzerland, this guy travelled to Saigon to document the life of the rich and famous in the “Sin City” of Vietnam, and then to the mines in the very north of the country with the aid of a translator. There he captured the portraits of miners and the conditions they work in, demonstrating the vast gap in the lifestyles and quality of life of the Vietnamese. I highly suggest taking a look at his portfolio on a computer to fully appreciate the quality of his work.
http://www.mirkories.ch

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